Territories

Territorializing the city

We need to territorialize the city, change the scale we use when we look at it and work on it. Understand the implications of urbanization both for its immediate surroundings and for what lies farther afield, outside the range of any map.

A vision that aims to broadening the scope of what the urban sphere includes. A perspective with the capacity to territorialize, to put the city in a broader context, connecting it with the environment and the world, with the people who live in it, visit it, remember it.

The commons

City as a sharing space

Cities are the scenario of social pacts. From the individual to the collective.

Heritage

Unveiling the city symbolic values

Besides of its important role as a driver of culture (and the visitor's economy), heritage embodies the symbolic relation between citizens and their city. Most relevant monuments have catalysed common social values for a long time. However, the disruption of social networks and other digital tools has radically transformed the identification and beloging processes, to the point that identities are not only physical but digital. In this context, we need to address both the conservation of heritage sites and the creation of new symbolic values associated to the traces that citizens create in the digital world.
On the other side, we need new mechanisms to help communicate knowledge about public heritage, engaging civil society in its classification and other identification processes.

We have actively promoted the creation of several interactive platforms to disseminate heritage. We have also helped different stakeholders to create digital narratives based on heritage.

Inequality

The spatial injustice

The transformations of economic relationships and models have come with the incorporation of more precarious social conditions. From bike delivery gig-workers to tourist apartment hosts who live with strangers, sacrificing their privacy, each new “success” in the innovation economy is also the revelation of a vulnerability in the social contract.

Night-time

Planning the 24 hour city

Today, night-time planning is of the utmost importance in urbanism, becoming a condition for opportunity but also a space of conflict.

Night poses significant challenges in urban settings, from achieving energy savings and controlling light pollution to finding the balance between residents’ rest and a growing business activity, not to mention defining a shared identity distinct from that of the day-time city.

Health

Collective care

Our individual health depends on collective health, whether we are talking about pandemics or the chronic ills of contemporary society (such as air pollution, noise pollution or sedentarism). Our health depends on the health of our environment and its characteristics.
That is why we should make cities into collective health organizations that leave behind the vision of health treated individualistically to make collective habitation into a form of caring for ourselves and others.

Public space

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Housing

New forms of living

Transforming an area of territory in a liveable environment means to provide housing where citizens can grow, generate employment that allows for livelihoods, to guarantee health and access to services. Housing must be a right for all citizens.

Today, it is still necessary to provide adequate forms of housing for the diversity of family units and the new collective habitat models. Housing requires specific solutions for different genders, ages, incomes and family units, and can be a possible source of shared facilities, storage space, urban services and more sustainable mobility. This typological diversity needs to be addressed in housing policy planning, quantifying these requirements and integrating them into the overall housing mix.

We have advised local and regional authorities in the drafting of housing policies that focus on urban regeneration and tourist gentrification. We have also created and visualised indicators to monitor different aspects of housing policies and plans.

Livability

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nam pretium metus vitae libero molestie elementum. Sed venenatis auctor tincidunt. Donec accumsan, sem nec pretium commodo, lectus enim volutpat tellus, quis semper enim nisi non augue. Cras eget ante non risus elementum tempor eget vel diam. Etiam eget lobortis enim. Pellentesque pretium at turpis eu commodo. Nam ac arcu at eros pulvinar dignissim. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. In tincidunt tortor id eros efficitur, non ultrices urna dignissim. In eu tempus mi. Etiam sodales nisl sit amet porta pharetra. Curabitur ullamcorper eleifend finibus. Nunc purus lectus, pharetra condimentum dolor eget, aliquam vehicula nisl. Donec quis dui ac mauris dictum vehicula.

Mobility

From moving people to transporting goods

Today, we are in the midst of a crucial transition of urban mobility, fuelled by the need of descarbonisation. The disappearance of private vehicles (as a result of new options tied to mobility as a service) along with improvements in public transportation (network, frequency and mixed-mode), will help us reduce the spaces currently occupied for circulation and individual parking (transforming them into other uses with added value for the city) in favor of new spaces for intermodality and mobility services.

That implies intertwining planning and mobility with an eye to achieving that future and providing nearby access to all the necessary uses for a full life. As a result of this active mobility model (walking and cycling), the city becomes an infrastructure that promotes healthy habits and generates collective health.
On the other side, the management of freight mobility is becoming a major issue in urban areas. Offshoring production and storage generates intense internal logistic flows which have been intensified by the emergence of e-commerce, forcing us to address logistics needs inside the city.
Engaged with better cities